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Things to consider before rebranding your business

Rebranding your business can seem like a daunting task, as it can involve a range of arduous tasks such as changing designs, updating clients, retraining staff and changing your marketing strategies.

However, rebranding can be an option for many businesses if:

To make the task of rebranding seem less daunting, consider these tips before starting to help you in your process.

Evaluate your need for rebranding
Make sure that the reason for your rebranding is valid and don’t act on impulse decisions. Rebranding can take a lot of time and resources and can often decrease your business if not done successfully, so it is important that you evaluate if rebranding is right for your business and outline the reasons why. It can be helpful to talk to staff about it to get ideas from people who are also invested in the success of your business.

Plan a budget
Before you rush into rebranding your business, make sure you have the funds to do so. Research and estimate how many resources will go into different areas of rebranding, e.g. marketing, website design, training staff etc. and outline a budget that can help you manage your finances through the process.

Have a strategy
Before you start rebranding, plan out a strategy that will guide you in the process and can increase the chances of success. This will help the process run more smoothly and prevent unexpected challenges that could detriment your business.

Solidify your mission and values
Having a clear understanding of the mission and values you want your business to have going forward can help you make important branding decisions and help build the foundation for your new brand. Having you and your staff on the same page with the business mission and values can improve efficiency and motivation when working on the rebrand.

Posted on 13 February '20, under Business. No Comments.

Taking a super pension

Once you have met your preservation age (between 55 and 60 depending on when you were born), you can choose to take a super pension. There are six main types of super pension:

The standard conditions of release for super pension withdrawals are:

The amount you withdraw can have an impact on any Age Pension entitlements you have, so be aware of these implications when deciding to withdraw an amount. You should also be aware of the transfer balance cap of $1.6 million that you’re allowed to move to an account-based pension. For super pension income streams, you generally need to transfer funds from your accumulation account to your retirement account for your pension.

Posted on 13 February '20, under Super. No Comments.

Do you have to pay tax on super death benefits?

When someone dies, their superannuation usually gets transferred to their beneficiary as superannuation death benefits. Depending on who the beneficiary is, the benefits may be taxed in some circumstances.

If you are a beneficiary, the amount of tax you pay depends on factors such as:

Someone who is tax-dependant will:

Lump sum payments

Lump sum super benefits paid to tax-dependant beneficiaries are not taxed, whereas those who are not tax-dependent will need to pay more tax and will only be able to receive the benefit as a lump sum. Not all super death benefits paid to a non-tax dependant are subject to tax. There are tax-free components that are made up of contributions after-tax that the member made to their super.

The taxed element (where the member paid tax in their super) of the taxable component of the benefit is subject to a maximum tax rate of 15% plus the Medicare levy. The untaxed element (where the death benefit is being paid from an untaxed super fund or includes proceeds from a life insurance policy held by the fund) of the taxable component of the benefit is subject to a maximum tax rate of 15% plus the Medicare levy.

Income stream payments

If the death benefit is paid in the form of an income stream, the tax treatment of the payment is dependent on the age of the deceased and beneficiary at the time.

If the deceased or the beneficiary is aged 60 or over at the time of the benefactor’s death and the super is paid from a taxed super fund, then the payment will not be taxed. If the age of the deceased and the age of the beneficiary are both under 60, the taxable portion of income stream payments will be treated as assessable income but will be entitled to a tax offset equal to 15% of the amount.

Posted on 13 February '20, under Tax. No Comments.

What to know about reverse mortgages

A financial dilemma that is becoming increasingly common is finding a way to fund a comfortable retirement lifestyle without having to sell the family home. One solution to this is a reverse mortgage; a loan that allows homeowners to convert part of the equity in their home into cash.

Money from a reverse mortgage can then be received as a regular income stream, line of credit, lump sum, or a combination of these options. No income is required to qualify for a reverse mortgage, which makes them ideal for those who have retired from the workforce.

Given the nature of this type of loan, it is important that homeowners understand the risks involved and consider how they can protect themselves as much as possible. Risks associated with reverse mortgages include:

Posted on 6 February '20, under Money. No Comments.

Keeping your virtual team on track

Managing a virtual team can offer challenges that you won’t experience in-person teamwork. It can be harder to schedule meetings, show demonstrations and build connections. However, having a virtual team offers convenience, opportunity and freedom for the team members, so here are some tips to help you make it work…

Define goals and roles
At the start of the project, outline the project goals and objectives so that everyone is working towards the same thing. Delegate roles and obligations to each team member to avoid confusion and overlap. This will keep the team on track despite not physically seeing what each other is up to.

Stay engaged
In-person teams have many opportunities to check in with each other and see each other’s progress. As a virtual manager, it is important to create opportunities to stay in touch with your team, such as having regular phone calls or checkpoint meetings. This will provide your team with regular reminders of work that will help keep them on track and meeting checkpoint deadlines.

Use online tools
While you’ll most likely already be using online messaging tools, there are plenty of other apps and platforms you can also use to improve organisation and productivity. You can search for collaborative tools for things like mind mapping, video calls, sketching, calendars, to-do lists and schedules. These online tools can help your team see each other’s ideas, progress and deadlines.

Create time for casual interactions
Building connections between team members can be difficult with exclusively online work. If appropriate, you can consider creating opportunities for your team to get to know each other on a more casual basis to improve moods and collaboration. If everyone in the team lives very remotely, you can have more relaxed video calls where everyone can introduce themselves and chat as well as work. If the team lives in the same city, consider having in-person meetings and outings.

Posted on 6 February '20, under Business. No Comments.

When a trustee goes bankrupt…

SMSF members need to be aware of the rules that govern their fund, including what to do when one member becomes bankrupt.

A requirement of an SMSF is that each individual trustee of the SMSF must be a member of the SMSF. In the case of corporate trustees, every member must be a director. This means all members are connected and held accountable for one another. If one member enters bankruptcy, they will be categorised by the ATO as a “disqualified person”, meaning they can no longer act as trustee of the SMSF.

Where a disqualified person continues to act as an SMSF trustee or director, they will be committing an offence that is subject to criminal and civil penalties. The ATO provides a six-month grace period to allow a restructure of the SMSF so that it either meets the basic conditions required or can be rolled over into an industry fund. During the six-month grace period, the ATO requires:

Posted on 6 February '20, under Super. No Comments.

Can you claim deductions for employee training?

Employees of a small business may need to develop their expertise or skills in a particular area to better perform their duties. While training courses like seminars and one-day intensives can be a worthwhile investment, there are still a few things employers should consider from a tax point of view.

Employers can generally claim deductions for the full costs incurred when providing education to employees, including aspects like course fees and travel costs. Paying for employee work-related course fees commonly constitutes a fringe benefit and is subject to FBT. However, FBT law allows a full or partial reduction of FBT payable provided that the ‘otherwise deductible’ rule is met. The ‘otherwise deductible rule’ implies that if the employee had paid the expense themselves, they could claim a deduction for the expense. The business could then provide the benefit to the employee without having to pay FBT on the amounts.

An education expense is considered to be hypothetically deductible to the employee depending on the type of course or education studied. The course must have a satisfactory connection to an employee’s current employment, maintain or improve the skills or knowledge required for the employee’s current role, or result in an increase in the employee’s income.

Posted on 6 February '20, under Tax. No Comments.

Why you need business interruption insurance

With many small businesses often being the livelihood for their entire families, owners should consider taking out business interruption insurance in order to safeguard against financial loss experienced as a result of incidents such as fire, floods, damage and burglaries.

With statistics showing one in four small businesses would not survive if they had to close their doors for three months, business interruption insurance can get you through a temporary crisis by protecting your cash flow.

Business interruption insurance provides cover against a loss of gross profit and differs from insurance covering business property, equipment and stock. This form of insurance covers the ongoing expenses that need to be paid even if a business is not generating any revenue, like staff wages, supplier invoices, rent or loan repayments.

Business interruption insurance claims can be one of the more tricky types of claims a business can make. Some common issues include:

Posted on 29 January '20, under Business. No Comments.

New SMSF alert system

The ATO has introduced a new method of updating SMSF trustees of changes to their fund. From 3 February 2020, email and/or text message alert will be sent out when there are changes in the SMSF, such as;

If you receive an alert and are not aware of changes being made to your SMSF, you should contact the other trustees or directors of the corporate trustee of your SMSF and any other representatives authorised to make changes to your SMSF, such as your tax agent.

The ATO messages will never ask you to reply by text or email or to provide personal information, such as your tax file number (TFN), your personal bank account number or BSB.

The system was expected to start back in November 2019 but was delayed due to technical difficulties. The process has now been confirmed to be working as intended.

Posted on 29 January '20, under Super. No Comments.

Tax implications of leasing commercial premises

Leasing commercial premises, such as an office building, hotels or stores have their own struggles compared to being a residential landlord. Making the correct tax payment and knowing what you can and can’t claim is key in being a successful commercial landlord.

When leasing out a commercial property, you must include the full amount of rent in you earn in your income tax return. You can claim deductions for expense related to renting out the property for the periods it is being rented or is available for rent, such as:

Tax deductions cannot be claimed on:

As a commercial property landlord, you are liable for GST when your property is up for lease if you are registered, or required to be registered for GST. You can claim GST credits on your purchases that relate to renting out your property, such as managing agent’s fees subject to the normal GST credits rules.

Posted on 29 January '20, under Tax. No Comments.

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GERALDTON WA 6530

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